View this email as a Web page Please add BEEF Stocker Trends to your Safe Sender list.

News and views on stocker segment issues from BEEF magazine.
July 11, 2006 A Prism Business Media Publication
ISSUE CONTENTS
Water Quality Can Evaporate, Too

Pasture Conditions Continue Decline

Bulls Vs. Steers

August 8

September 28

Lower Placements -- Higher Prices

Questions & Comments


About This Newsletter
To unsubscribe from this newsletter go to: Unsubscribe

To subscribe to this newsletter, go to: Subscribe

Be sure to check out www.beefstockerusa.org for all your stocker cattle information and management needs.


Stocker Management
Water Quality Can Evaporate, Too
"Drought makes it imperative for producers to monitor the quality of water their livestock are drinking," say South Dakota State University (SDSU) specialists.

Using South Dakota as an example, Cody Wright, SDSU beef specialist, explains, "Water from stock dams, streams and wells is often high in total dissolved solids (TDS), and especially sulfates."

Drought makes the situation worse because salt concentrations increase from enhanced evaporation and diminished moisture recharge. In addition, SDSU researchers note drought conditions sometimes force producers to use water of marginal quality if no other water is available. Animals will voluntarily consume less poor-quality water, and eat less feed/forage as a result.

Russ Daly, SDSU Extension DVM, adds that livestock may experience increasingly serious health and production problems as water quality declines.

More specifically, in South Dakota -- where it appears sulfates are the salt that causes most problems -- Daly explains high sulfate intake may cause health problems in ruminants. The most notable of these problems is sulfur-induced polioencephalomalacia (PEM). Symptoms of sulfur-induced PEM include lethargy, anorexia, blindness, muscle tremor, exaggerated response to sound or touch, and a lack of coordination, which progresses to staggering, weakness; eventually it leads to convulsions and inability to get up.

Recent research suggests sulfur-induced PEM may be different than another type of PEM caused by a thiamin (Vitamin B1) deficiency. In the case of sulfur-induced PEM, supplemental thiamin has produced mixed results.

According to SDSU researchers, the level of sulfur intake that's problematic varies by the type of diet the cattle are consuming. Sulfur intakes below 0.3% of diet dry matter (including contribution of water) are safe for all classes of cattle. Levels above 0.3% can be associated with sporadic cases of polio in cattle on high-grain diets. Cattle consuming forage-based diets can consume as much as 0.5% safely. Intakes of greater than 0.7% may be associated with a significant number of cases, regardless of diet.

If producers continue using water with high sulfates, SDSU specialists said there are steps they can take to help lessen the risk to livestock.

When situations dictate the continued use of water with high sulfates, SDSU specialists said these steps can help lessen the risk:
  • Check livestock frequently, minimize other sources of sulfur/sulfates in the diet.
  • Monitor water quality at regular intervals.
  • Do what is possible to minimize heat stress.
  • Work with a veterinarian to develop a protocol for treating acute cases of sulfur-induced PEM, as animals often die from the disease if not treated promptly.
  • Consider alternative water or blending "good" and "bad" water, especially in very hot weather.
  • Producers who have multiple water sources should test all sources and formulate a water-use strategy. Use marginal water first, saving good-quality water for later in the summer, since water quality will likely decline over the summer.
Further, these specialists explain cattle consuming water with elevated sulfate levels should receive a trace-mineral supplement fortified with copper and possibly thiamin. They caution that the research on thiamin supplementation has been very inconsistent; thus, positive responses aren't a given. Producers should work with their nutritionist to achieve adequate consumption of mineral supplements, which can be difficult when salts in water are elevated.

SDSU researchers note there are several factors that increase water intake, thereby increasing the likelihood animals may show ill effects from poor-quality water. These include: large physical size, lactation, dark coat color, increased physical exertion, decreased forage moisture, confinement, and increased environmental temperature.

Find the complete article at agbionews.sdstate.edu/News/newsrelease.cfm?id=2568

Or, to learn more about how sulfate type in stock water can affect cattle's water intake, read a BEEF magazine article by Amanda Grout and David Fraser at: beef-mag.com/news/beef_sulfate_type_stock/index.html



ADVERTISEMENT



Seeing is believing.

If you're tired of re-treating cattle for pinkeye, it's time to look for a treatment with the power to see cattle through recovery. TETRADURE™ 300 (oxytetracycline) Injection provides therapeutic blood levels for 7 to 8 days.* To see more about TETRADURE™ 300 (oxytetracycline) Injection, talk to your veterinarian. Or, for TETRADURE 300 product information, click here.

* Not for use in lactating dairy animals. Adverse reactions, including injection site swelling, restlessness, ataxia, inflammation and respiratory abnormalities, have been reported.

™TETRADURE is a trademark of Merial. © 2005 Merial Limited. All rights reserved.

Weather And Crops
Pasture Conditions Continue Decline
The most recent numbers from the National Ag Statistics Service (NASS) continue to offer detail to the reason cow slaughter is up. Compared to last year, 14% less pasture is rated Good or Excellent, and 14% more is rated as Poor or worse.

More specifically, for the week ending July 2, according to the National Ag Statistics Service:

States with the worst pasture conditions -- at least 30% of the acreage rated poor or worse -- include: Alabama (66%); Arizona (78%); Colorado (65%); Georgia (43%); Kansas (33%); Louisiana (50%); Mississippi (40%); Missouri (41%); Nebraska (50%); New Mexico (74%); North Dakota (31%); Oklahoma (58%); South Dakota (46%); Texas (71%); and Wyoming (53%).

On the wet side of the fence, states with the most lush pasture conditions -- at least 40% rated good or better -- include: Arkansas (41%); Idaho (89%); Illinois (62%); Indiana (79%); Iowa (49%); Kentucky (60%); Maine (75%); Maryland (53%); Michigan (55%); Minnesota (57%); Montana (44%); Nevada (61%); New York (69%); North Carolina (52%); Ohio (69%); Oregon (61%); Pennsylvania (65%); South Carolina (53%); Tennessee (52%); Utah (57%); Virginia (46%); Washington (71%); West Virginia (51%); Wisconsin (59%).

Pasture -- 29% is rated Good and 5% is rated Excellent, compared to 40% and 8%, respectively last year. 20% is rated Poor and 15% is ranked Very Poor, compared to 15% and 6% respectively at the same time last year.

Corn -- 10% is at or beyond the silking stage, which is on par with last year and with the five-year average. 68% is rated Good or better, compared to 62% last year.

Soybeans -- Blooming has begun on 18% of the acreage, 1% behind last year, but 5% ahead of normal. 64% is rated Good or better; 58% was at the same time last year.

Winter Wheat -- 65% of the acreage has been harvested. That's 9% ahead of last year and 10% ahead of the normal pace.

Spring Wheat -- 72% of the crop is at or beyond the heading stage, which is 19% ahead of last year and 26% ahead of the five-year average. 52% is rated Good or better, compared to 81% last year.

Barley -- Heading advanced to 58%, compared to 44% at this time last year and 43% for normal. 67% is rated Good or better, compared to 81% last year.

Sorghum -- 22% of the acreage is in the heading stage, which is 6% ahead of last year and 4% ahead of average. 50% is ranked Good or better, compared to 64% last year.

Oats -- Heading advanced to 89% of the acreage, which is 7% ahead of last year and 13% ahead of average. 42% is rated Good or better, compared to 66% last year.



ADVERTISEMENT

Don't take a chance. Treat all incoming cattle with IVOMEC® Plus (ivermectin/clorsulon)

Liver flukes are spreading and every load of incoming cattle could be carrying them. The liver fluke problem is hard to diagnose and rarely shows in clinical signs. Only IVOMEC® Plus (ivermectin/clorsulon) kills liver flukes and other internal and external parasites, all in a single dose. Product information.

®IVOMEC and the CATTLE HEAD LOGO are registered trademarks of Merial. © 2006 Merial Limited. All rights reserved.

Stocker Business
Bulls Vs. Steers
When it comes to ferreting out the stocker potential of bull calves compared to steers, John F. Currin, DVM, a professor at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, says the real question boils down to figuring out the post-purchase cost of the bulls.

According to Currin, the extra costs associated with buying bull calves include:
  • The cost of castration.
  • Decreased weight gain post-castration.
  • Increased likelihood of getting shipping fever (BRD).
  • Increased likelihood of calf loss to death (from BRD or castration complication).
In an article he published last month, Currin cites several studies that detail the lost performance, increased pull rate, decreased response rate and increased health costs of bulls compared to steers. Overall, he estimates the decreased value of bull calves, relative to comparable steers ranges from $3-$6/cwt. for three-weight calves to $6-$12/cwt. for six-weights (Table 1).

You can find Currin's article at www.ext.vt.edu/news/periodicals/livestock/aps-06_06/aps-337.html

Table 1
Weight of bulls
purchased
Decreased value of bull calves
relative to comparable steer calves (per cwt.)
300 lbs $3-$6
400 lbs $4-$8
500 lbs $5-$10
600 lbs $6-$12

Source: Dr. John F. Currin, VA-MD Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, VA Tech, Livestock Update, June 2006


Events
August 8
University of Arkansas "Conservation Tillage and Stocker Cattle," Clark County Fairgrounds, Arkadelphia, AR. For more info, call 870-246-2281.

September 28
Kansas State University (KSU) Beef Stocker Conference, KSU Beef Stocker Unit, Manhattan, KS. For more info, call Lois Schreiner at 785-532-1267.


ADVERTISEMENT



Seeing is believing.

If you're tired of re-treating cattle for pinkeye, it's time to look for a treatment with the power to see cattle through recovery. TETRADURE™ 300 (oxytetracycline) Injection provides therapeutic blood levels for 7 to 8 days.* To see more about TETRADURE™ 300 (oxytetracycline) Injection, talk to your veterinarian. Or, for TETRADURE 300 product information, click here.

* Not for use in lactating dairy animals. Adverse reactions, including injection site swelling, restlessness, ataxia, inflammation and respiratory abnormalities, have been reported.

™TETRADURE is a trademark of Merial. © 2005 Merial Limited. All rights reserved.

Markets
Lower Placements -- Higher Prices
There was no National Stocker summary issued by the Ag Marketing Service last week due to the holiday-shortened week. Fed-cattle trade was basically at a standstill, too. But a positive tone for stocker and feeder cattle continues based on the bullish June Cattle on Feed report issued June 23.

As Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University livestock economist, explained shortly after the report came out, "In the absence of infinite supply of feeder cattle, there must be a limit to the ability to continually increase feedlot placements. The recent rally in fed prices and strength in feeder markets indicated the market was beginning to realize feeder supplies would be fairly tight in the second half of the year. This latest report should remove any remaining doubts the feedlot situation so far this year has been more a matter of changes in the timing of feedlot production than a huge annual increase."

Specifically, Peel noted, "USDA's June Cattle on Feed report included smaller than expected placements and larger than expected marketings, which resulted in a June 1 on-feed inventory of 104% of a year ago. This is substantially lower than the May 1 total of 109% above the previous year and lower than pre-report expectations. May placements were down a whopping 14% from last year and marketings were up 9% from one year ago."

Note: There was no National Stocker Summary issued by AMS last week because of the limited auction trade due to the July 4th holiday. The summary below reflects the week ended June 30 for Medium and Large 1 -- 500- to 550-lb., 600- to 650-lb., and 700- to 750-lb. feeder heifers and steers (unless otherwise noted). The list is arranged in descending order by auction volume and represents sales reported in the weekly USDA National Feeder and Stocker Cattle Summary:

Summary Table
State Volume Steers Heifers
Calf Weight 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs. 500-550 lbs. 600-650 lbs. 700-750 lbs.
TX 27,900 $124.23 $121.59 $117.51 $119.80 $111.48 $107.50
OK 24,800 $137.82 $125.68 $119.24 $122.60 $117.48 $109.30
MO 22,400 $133.43 $127.00 $117.69 $125.73 $117.17 $109.57
KY* 14,300 $116-126 $110-120 $103-1125 $110-120 $100-1103 $95-1055
AL 13,200 $120-130 $113-118 $105-1074 $113-121 $102-113 $94-1025
TN* 8,800 $122.12 $112.73 $103.34 $111.60 $104.10 $97.50<
GA*(***) 8,600 $114.31 $108.75 $95.10 $110.46 $99.83 $98.384
KS 7,900 $132.25 $127.33 $119.39 ** $116.81 $114.54
AR 7,600 $118-128 $109-1193 $103-113 $109-1191 $102-1123 $98-108
FL 7,500 $100-117 $93-109 $85-102 $96-111 $91-105 $87-964
NE 7,500 $138.292 $125.944 $124.43 $117.962 $121.07 $114.82
SD 6,700 ** ** $124.09 ** $121.86 $115.52
Carolinas* 6,500 $109-125 $100-1183 $87-1065 $100-125 $91-110.503 $79-905
MS* 5,900 $110-1201 $100-110 $85-955 $100-1101 $90-1003 **
CO 4,500 $130.51 $124.252 $113.80 $116.222 ** $100.69
LA 4,300 $114-125 $104-1143 ** $105-117 $100-1103 **
IA 2,500 ** $124.274 $119.89 $129.862 $126.69 $109.91
VA 2,100 $135.47 $119.14 $114.80 $114.792 $106.04 $106.324
WY * 1,600 $115.252 $113.92 ** $112.82 ** **
WA* 1,100 ** ** ** ** $107.05 $103.76

* Plus 2
** None reported at this weight or near weight
(***) Steers and bulls
NDNo Description 1500-600 lbs.
2550-600 lbs.
3600-700 lbs.
4650-700 lbs.
5700-800 lbs.
6750-800 lbs.
7800-850 lbs.


Contact
Questions & Comments
Please send questions to:

Wes Ishmael, Contributing Editor, BEEF Stocker Trends, at wesleysink@aol.com

Joe Roybal, Editor, BEEF magazine, at jroybal@beef-mag.com



ADVERTISEMENT




You are subscribed to this newsletter as #email#

To get BEEF Stocker Trends in a different format (Text or HTML), or to change your e-mail address, please visit your profile page to change your delivery preferences.

For questions concerning delivery of this newsletter, please contact our Customer Service Department at:
Customer Service Department
Delta Farm Press
A Prism Business Media publication
US Toll Free: 866-505-7173 International: 847-763-9504 Email:beef-mag@pbinews.com
US Toll Free: (866) 505-7173
International: (402) 505-7173

Prism Business Media
9800 Metcalf Avenue
Overland Park, KS 66212

Copyright 2006, Prism Business Media. All rights reserved. This article is protected by United States copyright and other intellectual property laws and may not be reproduced, rewritten, distributed, re-disseminated, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast, directly or indirectly, in any medium without the prior written permission of Prism Business Media.