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A PRIMEDIA Property September 28, 2005 | 050928   
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 >> Logan Hawkes

 >> No quick cures for glyphosate-resistant weeds

 >> Pilot initiative promotes conservation planning

 >> Senate avoids battle over payment limits

 >> Soybean rust fears lessen, drought concerns rise

 >> An economist's view of the economy

 >> Tour Brazil with Corn & Soybean Digest Magazine

 >> After Katrina: USDA eases transportation stress

 >> News from the Top of the Hill

 >> $24,000 award for conservation practices

 >> USDA catches trade off guard with estimates



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Keith Philips
Kahoka, MO


"Last year, we had some ground that's both tiled and irrigated, and they ended up being under flood water. I had sprayed them with Quadris, and even with being totally submerged in water, they still yielded 62-63 bu/A. Quadris saved those soybeans; if we hadn't used Quadris, I think they would have been consumed by foliar diseases."

  EDITOR'S NOTE
Logan Hawkes
09/28/05    Crop News Weekly
Fall has fallen, yet tropical weather continues to grab the headlines down South while many farmers are busy with harvest throughout the Midwest. Calling it a strange weather year is an understatement. It's not a good year for fuel prices either, and that problem is only going to get worse. The pinch is alrady being felt on the farm - again. To add insult to injury, as hard as it may be to swallow, tropical forecasters are telling us the busy hurricane season may not be over yet. It's a very strange weather year indeed. But then, most of them are in this business.

In the news this week, glyphosate-resistant weeds are rearing their ugly heads with little relief in sight. Also this week, Agriculture Deputy Secretary Chuck Conner has announced nine states are participating in the first conservation planning sign-up, a pilot initiative that emphasizes the importance of conservation planning. Elsewhere, and some good news this week, the Senate has passed a $100.2 billion spending bill for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration with considerably less heartburn than some observers anticipated. Also in the news, USDA is taking steps to reduce stress on the grain transportation system caused by Hurricane Katrina.

You'll find these stories and a lot more in this issue of Crop News Weekly. Happy reading.



  FROM OUR MAGAZINES
No quick cures for glyphosate-resistant weeds
09/27/05   
For five years, glyphosate-resistant horseweed has moved swiftly across farmers' fields. Despite the work of many great researchers there remain no quick remedies to the troublesome weed. Mostly a no-till problem, the history of resistant horseweed (or marestail) is interesting. "The resistant type was first discovered in Delaware in 2000," said Andy Kendig, Missouri Extension weed specialist at the annual Delta Center field day outside Portageville, Mo., on Aug. 31. "In 2001, it was found in western Tennessee. In 2002, it was found in Missouri and Arkansas. - David Bennett, Farm Press Editorial Staff

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"In the past, I always had good luck with Bicep II MAGNUM® followed by Callisto®. So, a switch to Lexar® wasn't a hard choice. Lexar is a good fit for my ground and weeds -- it has done a tremendous job for me. I applied Lexar right after planting this year, and I haven't had to go back to respray."
Roger Johnson, Malvern, IA

Pilot initiative promotes conservation planning
09/26/05   
Agriculture Deputy Secretary Chuck Conner has announced nine states are participating in the first conservation planning sign-up, a pilot initiative that emphasizes the importance of conservation planning to help farmers and ranchers be better prepared to apply for conservation programs and to comply with federal, state, tribal and local environmental regulations. All agricultural land is eligible for conservation planning technical assistance, including cropland, orchards, vineyards, pasture and range, woodland and farmsteads. - Southwest Farm Press

Senate avoids battle over payment limits
09/24/05   
The Senate passed a $100.2 billion spending bill for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration with considerably less heartburn than some observers anticipated. The potential for gastric distress was reduced when Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, apparently decided not to introduce an amendment requiring stricter payment limits on farm program payments.
Grassley's no-show came after a group of 16 farm and farm-related organizations called on Senate leaders to reject any attempts to "substantially alter" the 2002 farm bill as the Senate began deliberations on the agricultural appropriations bill. The House passed its version of the bill in July. - Forrest Laws, Farm Press Editorial Staff

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The rise of resistant weeds is no longer debatable -- it's a fact. Resistant weeds are already reducing yields and increasing costs for growers in at least 10 states. And it's forcing growers everywhere to make a choice: Fight now or pay later.

If you won't give an inch to resistance, visit http://www.resistancefighter.com

Soybean rust fears lessen, drought concerns rise
09/26/05   
Asian soybean rust may have been the most hyped fear but a late-season dry spell will be a much larger factor in deciding Georgia's yields. "Our crop is comprised of a few Group IVs, some Vs and VIs and a lot of VIIs," said Phil Jost, Georgia Extension soybean specialist on Sept. 22. "Most of the IVs have already been harvested. The Vs and VIs are either being harvested or close to it. Our Group VIIs are almost at R-6. So the majority of our crop is past the point where we're concerned with soybean rust. - David Bennett, Farm Press Editorial Staff

An economist's view of the economy
09/26/05   
The Road Warrior of Agriculture writes:, "A recent speaking assignment at the Homestead Resort in Hot Springs, VA, allowed me the opportunity to listen to a national economist, Jeff Thredgold. Thredgold indicated that the U.S. would be in a period of low inflation...agriculture would suggest inflation is alive and well due to the dependence on oil, water and inflating land prices." - Dave Kohl, The Corn & Soybean Digest

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Manage Rust, Other Soybean Maladies with Help from PHI
Asian Soybean Rust may be top-of-mind right now, but the Plant Health Initiative (PHI) reminds growers not to overlook SCN or aphids, either. The PHI provides management information on these and other pests, and links to other resources through their Web site - http://www.planthealth.info

Tour Brazil with Corn & Soybean Digest Magazine
09/28/05   
The Corn & Soybean Digest's fourth annual trip to Brazil is set for Jan.12-25, 2006, and you're encouraged to sign up before deadline. Greg Lamp, Editor of The Corn & Soybean Digest, and Clint Peck, Senior Editor of BEEF, will lead the tour exploring Brazil's tropical ag system and assess its strengths and weaknesses as a major competitor for international markets. Highlights include tours of large and small soybean farms, a beef packing plant, an ag research center and a major international export facility. For more information or to register: glamp@primediabusiness.com, 952-851-4667 or Renata Stephens, Capital Travel Solutions, renatas@ctsinc.com, 651/287-4900 or 800/635-5488. A complete itinerary can be viewed on the CTS website: http://www.ctsinc.com/Brazil2006.pdf.

After Katrina: USDA eases transportation stress
09/23/05   
USDA is taking steps to reduce stress on the grain transportation system caused by Hurricane Katrina. According to Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns, this includes assisting with the movement of barges of damaged corn from New Orleans; providing incentives for alternative grain storage; encouraging alternative shipping patterns to relieve pressure; and allowing producers to store USDA-owned corn on the farm with the option to purchase. - Elton Robinson, Farm Press Editorial Staff

News from the Top of the Hill
09/23/05   
Senate Passes Agriculture Appropriations - The U.S. Senate passed the fiscal year (FY) '06 agriculture appropriations bill. The bill provides $100.7 billion for USDA and the Food and Drug Administration. A number of issues important to the livestock industry were addressed during consideration of the bill:

  • Downer Animal - An amendment by Senator Daniel Akaka (D-HI) prohibits downer animals from being approved for human consumption. The amendment includes swine. This could have a negative economic impact on producers and industry. The House of Representatives defeated a similar amendment earlier this year. This issue will now be resolved in the House-Senate conference committee.

  • Country-of-Origin Labeling (COOL) - The bill maintains the current deadline of Sept. 30, 2006 for implementation of mandatory country-of-origin labeling. The House of Representatives delayed implementation until 2007. The House-Senate conference committee will decide this issue.

  • Japan - An amendment by Senator Ben Nelson (D-NE) was adopted that would prohibit the implementation of USDA's proposed rule to allow Japanese beef to be imported into the U.S. until Japan reopens its market for U.S. beef.

    Australia & Canada Explain Their Animal Identification Systems - The House Agriculture Committee held an informational hearing to review the experience Australia and Canada had in implementing their private sector-based animal identification (ID) systems. Congressman Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, said, "Among the reasons I have been an advocate of a private sector-based approach to animal ID is the success of the Canadian and Australian systems. In a relatively short period of time, both nations have moved forward (with) systems that are the envy of many in the international livestock community, and I think their experience in developing these systems is well worth our time and attention." David Palmer of Meat and Livestock Australia testified that the "underlying driver behind this initiative is the need to maintain and build consumer confidence in beef, both in Australia and the markets we serve worldwide." Issues that members of the committee were interested in were: mandatory vs. voluntary, confidentiality, cost, access to information, Freedom of Information Act, and timeliness. The committee plans additional hearings this year on animal ID.

    USDA Estimates Farm Production Losses - USDA estimates agricultural production losses due to hurricane Katrina at $900 million. Also, USDA estimates production losses due to the drought in the eastern Corn Belt at $1.3 billion. According to the report, Midwest corn and soybean producers have experienced reduced prices due to the "shipping interruption" in New Orleans ports.

    Jones Act Waiver for Agriculture - Twenty-one agriculture organizations sent a letter to President Bush requesting a temporary waiver of the Jones Act for agriculture shipments due to the affects of Hurricane Katrina. The letter states that "U.S. agriculture needs additional transportation capacity to move U.S. grains and oilseeds to regions, such as the Southeastern U.S., traditionally served by domestic transportation modes that have been stretched beyond capacity." The Jones Act requires goods being transported by water between U.S. points must travel on U.S.-flagged, U.S.-built, U.S.-crewed and U.S.-owned vessels. There are a small number of these ships that are available for agriculture, which increases the cost of transportation. Some of the groups signing the letter included: Agricultural Retailers Association, American Farm Bureau Federation, American Feed Industry Association, American Soybean Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Chicken Council, National Corn Growers Association, National Grain and Feed Association, National Turkey Federation, and North American Export Grain Association.

    USDA Actions To Ease Grain Transportation - USDA announced steps it is taking to help ease grain transportation problems caused by Hurricane Katrina. The actions include: 1) Assisting with the movement of barges of damaged corn from New Orleans; 2) Providing incentives for alternative grain storage; 3) Encouraging alternative shipping patterns to relieve pressure; and 4) Allowing producers to store USDA-owned corn on the farm with the option to purchase. For more information, producers should contact their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office or visit FSA's Web site at http://www.fsa.usda.gov.

    Congress Urges President To Restore Beef Trade With Japan - A bipartisan group of 19 Senators and more than 100 Congressmen have written President George W. Bush urging him to make "restoring market access for U.S. beef to Japan your highest economic priority with Japan." The letter reminded the President that continued closure of this market was costing the U.S. beef industry $100 million/month. Senators Wayne Allard (R-CO) and Ben Nelson (D-NE) coordinated the Senate letter, while Congressmen Jerry Moran (R-KS) and Rick Larsen (D-WA) coordinated the House letter.

    State Attorneys General Support Rehearing of BSE Case - Six state attorneys general filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in support of R-CALF USA's petition for a rehearing of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) case. The Ninth Circuit ruled earlier this summer to reopen the Canadian border to live cattle under 30 months of age and beef products. The state attorneys general represented were from Connecticut, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, and West Virginia.

    NPPC Honors Ambassador Johnson - The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) presented Ambassador Allen Johnson, U.S. Trade Representative chief agriculture negotiator, NPPC's "2005 Friend of the U.S. Pork Producer" award. Johnson was recognized for his work on keeping the Mexican market open for U.S. pork, the Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement, and quotas with the Russian Federation for U.S. pork. - Scott Shearer, National Hog Farmer

  • $24,000 award for conservation practices
    09/23/05   
    Years before most farmers could see the benefits from incorporating conservation practices and before the government aggressively sought to encourage it, David Barton led the way. Once again, government officials have singled out his environmental stewardship. This time, however, the honor extends beyond hanging another plaque on his office wall. - Andrew Bell, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    USDA catches trade off guard with estimates
    09/21/05   
    Grain producers will soon find out if USDA's September estimates of corn and soybean production were wildly optimistic, or a result of improved drought resistance, especially in corn hybrids. Soybean production was pegged at 2.856 billion bushels, up from last month's estimate of 2.79 billion bushels and down from last year's record 3.14 billion bushels. Corn was estimated at 10.64 billion bushels, up from last month's 10.35 billion bushels and down from last year's 11.8 billion bushels. Soybean ending stocks were estimated at 205 million bushels, while corn ending stocks were estimated at 2.08 billion bushels. - Elton Robinson, Farm Press Editorial Staff



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