Corn & Soybean Digest Farm Industry News
 :: SUBSCRIBE
 :: UNSUBSCRIBE
 :: PREFERENCES
 :: CONTACT US
A Prism Business Media Publication April 5, 2006 | 060405   
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 >> Logan Hawkes

 >> Senate Judiciary immigration bill would punish farmers

 >> Indiana attracts world's largest biodiesel plant

 >> An unexpected culprit in gas price escalation

 >> Fungicide unaffected by row widths

 >> News from the Top of the Hill

 >> Thiesse's Thoughts: March 31 crop report

 >> High fuel, fertilizer prices result in negative net worth

 >> Early start leads to early finish for soybean producers

 >> Expected Drop in U.S. corn acreage?

 >> ASA urges China to accept greater ag import access

 >> Brazil's advantages: land resources, plant breeding

 >> Alabama Senate passes BSE confidentiality legislation

 >> Iowa farmer, politician could be sincerely wrong

 >> Midwest farmers may see payment limits differently

 >> Seminar to explore biotechnology's potential impact

 >> Government payments key in 2006 survival

 >> Making the case for bio-diesel

 >> Rain -- too little too late for wheat?

 >> Sign Up for MarketMaxx

ADVERTISEMENT

By controlling a broad-spectrum of yield-robbing threats, growers rely on Quadris® fungicide year after year to protect soybean plants from damaging diseases. Years of research on commercial fields has proven that even in the absence of infection thresholds, Quadris can increase soybean yields. In summary across all field conditions, Quadris increased soybean yields by an average of 5 to 6 bu/A and helped to produce better quality beans. For more information on Quadris fungicide, please visit here http://www.farmassist.com/promo/quadris_landing/index.asp?nav=landingpage.html


  EDITOR'S NOTE
Logan Hawkes
04/05/06    Crop News Weekly
April has arrived and once again the Easter season is upon us - a little later this year than last. Regardless, it's a busy time on the farm and chances are good you're having trouble finding the time to keep up with the news. But it's a busy time in the news world as well and there's a lot of developing issues and stories you probably need to know. Let's get you briefed on the latest.

In the spotlight this week: with all the talk about immigration reform floating around Washington these days, I was wondering when someone would wake up to the impact some of the suggested reform would have on U.S. agriculture. Apparently someone is finally speaking out. The Chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee says the agricultural guest worker program language reported out by the Senate Judiciary Committee March 27 will "punish" farmers who have been abiding by the law and utilizing the H-2A program, the current, temporary guest worker program. Not only that, it would create a new "blue card" program that would enable current or future aliens to enter the United States, work for a farmer or rancher for a short time and then move on to other, "less back-breaking" forms of employment. In other news, Indiana's pace of rapid growth in bioenergy and energy self-sufficiency took another step forward last week as Governor Mitch Daniels announced that Louis Dreyfus Agriculture Industries LLC plans to build the world's largest biodiesel plant near Claypool. And speaking of fuel issues, talk about timing! While major oil company executives were being grilled by the Senate Judiciary Committee about record profits and the impact of consolidations on prices, gasoline pump prices were seeing one of the biggest short-term run-ups since Hurricane Katrina. Within the space of three weeks, starting late February, prices hereabouts rose more than 40 cents per gallon. Elsewhere on the farm front, as you know, soybean production is a game of inches every crop season. Do growers plant in 7.5-in. rows? Fifteen-in. rows? Thirty-in. rows? The row spacing question has taken on greater significance with Asian soybean rust now a potential threat in the United States. Find out the latest row recommendations this week. Elsewhere in the news, the Supreme Court refuses case against Tyson Foods; March 31 crop report coverage; negative net worth on the farm and an early start to the soybean season.

You'll find these stories and a lot more in this news-packed issue of Crop News Weekly. Happy reading.



ADVERTISEMENT

Combining weather data with soybean rust spore location information gathered from university sentinel plots and Syngenta-exclusive Syntinel Spore Traps into an easy-to-use mapping system, Syntinel RustTracker gives growers a simple solution for tracking rust. Housed on soybeanrust.com, these maps give growers the most comprehensive look at rust movement available. For more information on Syntinel RustTracker, please visit http://www.soybeanrust.com.
  FROM OUR MAGAZINES
Senate Judiciary immigration bill would punish farmers
04/01/06   
Saxby Chambliss says the agricultural guest worker program language reported out by the Senate Judiciary Committee March 27 will "punish" farmers who have been abiding by the law and utilizing the H-2A program, the current, temporary guest worker program. Not only that, it would create a new "blue card" program that would enable current or future aliens to enter the United States, work for a farmer or rancher for a short time and then move on to other, "less back-breaking" forms of employment, the chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee said. - Forrest Laws, Farm Press Editorial Staff

Indiana attracts world's largest biodiesel plant
04/04/06   
Indiana's pace of rapid growth in bioenergy and energy self-sufficiency took another step forward March 8 as Governor Mitch Daniels announced that Louis Dreyfus Agriculture Industries LLC plans to build the world's largest biodiesel plant near Claypool, Indiana. With this facility, two other biodiesel and six ethanol plants currently under construction, Indiana will become a leading producer in the biofuels industry. Indiana is the fifth largest corn state and the fourth largest soybean state and with the facilities under construction, the state will produce an additional 400 million gallons of ethanol annually and 95 million gallons of biodiesel (including Louis Dreyfus). - The Corn & Soybean Digest

An unexpected culprit in gas price escalation
04/03/06   
Talk about timing: While major oil company executives were being grilled by the Senate Judiciary Committee about record profits and the impact of consolidations on prices, gasoline pump prices were seeing one of the biggest short-term run-ups since Hurricane Katrina. Within the space of three weeks, starting late February, prices hereabouts rose more than 40 cents per gallon. In one two-day period, the price of regular unleaded went up 10 cents per gallon each day, hitting $2.499 before dropping back ever so slightly to the current $2.459. In California, the per gallon price of unleaded topped $2.60. - Hembree Brandon, Farm Press Editorial Staff

Fungicide unaffected by row widths
04/04/06   
Soybean production is a game of inches every crop season. Do growers plant in 7.5-in. rows? Fifteen-in. rows? Thirty-in. rows? The row spacing question has taken on greater significance with Asian soybean rust now a potential threat in the U.S. Fortunately for producers, Purdue University research indicates that row width has no bearing on fungicide spray coverage. The research project was inspired by farmer inquiries, says Shawn Conley, Purdue Extension soybean specialist. - The Corn & Soybean Digest

News from the Top of the Hill
03/31/06    National Hog Farmer
Farm Bill Summaries - Secretary of Agriculture Mike Johanns released a summary of the more than 4,000 comments from the 52 USDA Farm Bill Forums held in 48 states. The comments were summarized and placed into 41 general subject areas themes for further analysis. The 41 comment summary papers include three sections: factual background data about the topic, a summary of general opinions expressed, and a list of specific suggestions that are conveyed. The first theme that USDA will conduct further analysis is risk management. The summary papers, including ones on agricultural concentration, animal welfare, and country of origin labeling, can be found on USDA's website at http://www.usda.gov. Some of the opinions expressed on agricultural concentration include:

  • Eliminate the use of mandatory arbitration in contracts for the livestock industry.

  • Restrict a packing entity from having more than 25 percent of its slaughter mix from captive supplies on a per plant, per day basis.

  • Packers should only be able to won cattle one week prior to slaughter.

  • Enact reforms to protect producers in contracts by requiring contracts be written in plain language.

    Supreme Court Refuses Case Against Tyson Foods - The U.S. Supreme Court refused to revive the case against Tysons Foods by Leroy Pickett of Alabama and other producers. Pickett and the producers claimed that Tysons "used its market dominance to artificially push down cattle prices." Earlier a jury had agreed with Pickett and awarded them $1.28 billion. However, the trial judge overturned the jury verdict and the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with the judge. The National Farmers Union (NFU) in a statement said, "NFU is disappointed that the Supreme Court chose not to hear this very important case. Cattle producers across the country are faced with decreased competition for their cattle and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's failure to enforce anti-trust laws."

    CRP Sign-up - Farmers and ranchers have until April 14 to sign-up for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). CRP participants "voluntarily enroll highly erodible and other fragile cropland in CRP through long-term contracts of 10 to 15 years." Grasses, trees and other vegetation are planted on the enrolled land. Participants receive annual rental payments and a payment for up to 50 percent of the cost of establishing conservation covers. Eligible CRP offers will be evaluated on improving soil retention, water quality, wildlife habitat and air quality. More information is available at local USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices or at http://www.fsa.usda.gov/dafp/cepd/drpinfo.htm.

    AFBF & NFU Support Disaster Assistance - The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) and the National Farmers Union (NFU) held a joint press conference in support of disaster assistance legislation introduced by Senator Kent Conrad (D-ND). AFBF President Bob Stallman said, "This past year was one when several major natural disasters including droughts, floods, fires, tornadoes and hurricanes ravaged thousands of acres of agricultural land, plus, destroyed farmstead buildings and homes. The Emergency Agricultural Disaster Assistance Act of 2006 will provide help to producers for losses incurred during the 2005 crop year. Without such help, many producers will be forced out of business." The disaster legislation would provide emergency funding to farmers and ranchers who have suffered weather-related crop production shortfalls, quality losses, damage to livestock feed supplies and payments for the loss of livestock. The bill also helps farmers overcome losses as a result of energy prices.

    BSE Cases Declining - A recent report by the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) indicates that cases of BSE are declining worldwide. According to the report, the rate of reported cases has dropped 50 percent for each year over the past three years. "In 2004, 474 animals died of BSE around the world, compared with 878 in 2004 and 1646 in 2003."

    Pombo New Vice Chair of House AG - Congressman Richard Pombo (R-CA) has been named Vice Chairman of the House Agriculture Committee. Pombo has been a member of the committee since 1993. Also, Congressman Mike Sodrel (R-IN) has been named a member of the committee. These announcements are the result of Congressman John Boehner (R-OH) having to leave the committee because of his recent election as House Majority Leader. - Scott Shearer

  • Thiesse's Thoughts: March 31 crop report
    04/04/06   
    On March 31, 2005, USDA released its Prospective Plantings Report and its Quarterly Grain Stocks Report. Typically, these late March USDA reports are very critical to farm operators and grain traders because these reports tend to have a high impact on grain market prices in the spring and early summer. This is the time of the year when many farm operators try to sell remaining grain inventories from the previous growing season, as well as look for opportunities to forward price a portion of the anticipated crop for the current year. In a majority of years, corn and soybean prices usually reach their peak price for a calendar year sometime between April 1 and July 15. - Kent Thiesse, The Corn & Soybean Digest

    High fuel, fertilizer prices result in negative net worth
    04/03/06   
    High fuel and fertilizer prices continue to decrease the economic viability of farms represented in a baseline study released recently by the Agricultural and Food Policy Center at Texas A&M University in College Station. Farmers experienced as much as a 28 percent hike in fuel input costs in 2005, which also increased the likelihood of negative net cash flows, according to the report. Commodity price increases projected through 2010 won't be enough to offset increased input costs. - Blair Fannin, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Early start leads to early finish for soybean producers
    04/03/06   
    An early start means an early finish for soybean producers Don and Jimbo Davis, Tippo, Miss. That is why every one of their 3,000 soybean acres this year will be planted in Group 4s, ranging in maturity from 4.4 to 4.9. "This is the third year that we have had all Group 4s," Don said on a recent sunny March morning, taking a break from preparing a field for soybean planting. "When we had Group 5s, August used to be a big month for us, and we would pray for rain. We're also trying to beat the Asian rust and other diseases with the Group 4s. With Group 4s, we get to July 4, and we don't have to worry about it." - Elton Robinson, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Expected Drop in U.S. corn acreage?
    04/03/06    Corn E-Digest
    USDA's Prospective Plantings report shows farmers across the nation plan to slash corn acreage by 3.74 million acres, or 5%, compared to 2005. The report cites "the high cost of fuel and fertilizer" as the cause for the switch from corn to "less input-intensive crops such as soybeans." The report also shows farmers plan to increase U.S. soybean acreage 7% in 2006 compared to 2005. The National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) released the Prospective Plantings report on Friday, March 31. The report has already had an immediate affect on prices.

    ASA urges China to accept greater ag import access
    03/31/06   
    American Soybean Association (ASA) Vice-President Gary Joachim has stressed the importance of opening the Chinese market to further agricultural imports in the current Doha round of World Trade Organization (WTO) trade negotiations. Joachim testified during a Senate Finance Committee hearing March 29 on U.S./China economic relations where he cited preliminary analysis that China will account for between 35 and 40 percent of total world agricultural trade gains from a new WTO agreement. - Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Brazil's advantages: land resources, plant breeding
    03/31/06   
    On our fifth day in Brazil we discovered just how small the world is when we met another agricultural tour group at our hotel in Rondonopolis, Mato Grosso (MT). This group, a young-adult agricultural leadership class, was from Oklahoma State University. They, like us, were in Brazil to study soybean production, Asian soybean rust, and the impact of Brazil on international agricultural trade. Not so surprisingly, both groups were going to visit many of the same places. - Daryll E. Ray

    Alabama Senate passes BSE confidentiality legislation
    03/31/06   
    The Alabama State Senate has passed HB 254 with a vote of 20-6. This bill will provide for the confidentiality of information initially gathered by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries as the department implements and maintains a database for Animal Identification in accord and consistent with the United States Department of Agriculture's National Animal Identification System. Premises ID Registration has been implemented in the last year and Animal ID Registration is not far behind. The information on premises and animals, gathered at the request of Commissioner Sparks, is to protect the interest of public health, safety, and welfare. - Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Iowa farmer, politician could be sincerely wrong
    03/30/06   
    Mark W. Leonard sounds like a genuinely nice guy. Last year, he brought a cotton farmer from Mali in West Africa to church gatherings near his farm in Holstein, Iowa, to discuss U.S. farm subsidies. But being a nice guy doesn't mean that Leonard, who, according to a Wall Street Journal article, is a Republican candidate for agriculture secretary in Iowa, cannot also be terribly wrong. - Forrest Laws, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Midwest farmers may see payment limits differently
    03/30/06   
    Last fall's record and near-record soybean and corn crops haven't done much for commodity prices, but they may have helped some Midwest farmers get a different slant on the payment limit issue. Growers who thought payment limits were a "Southern problem" have begun to see the debate in a different light after grain had to be stockpiled across much of the Midwest, according to Dana Brooks, director of congressional relations for the American Farm Bureau Federation. - Forrest Laws, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Seminar to explore biotechnology's potential impact
    03/30/06   
    Enormous advances and opportunities are occurring in agricultural and industrial biotechnology, offering a chance to revitalize rural economies in Texas, a West Texas A&M University official said. West Texas A&M, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Texas Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development and the Amarillo Economic Development Corporation are hosting a special seminar to spotlight the possibilities. - Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Government payments key in 2006 survival
    03/29/06   
    If farmers had any doubts about the importance of government payments to their ability to survive higher fuel and fertilizer prices this year, all they have to do is look at Chuck Danehower's numbers. Danehower, farm management specialist with the University of Tennessee Extension Service, has calculated the yields growers in his area would need to break-even under the scenario of higher input costs anticipated for 2006. - Forrest Laws, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Making the case for bio-diesel
    03/29/06   
    As the cost of oil continues to rise in both price and strife, domestically produced bio-diesel looks better and better. The United States imports about 12.5 million barrels of oil per day. Some 5 million of those barrels come from OPEC nations. "Simple math tells us 5 million times $65 equals about $325 million per day going to OPEC," said Tommy Foltz during a recent presentation by the Mid-South Clean Fuels Coalition and sponsored by Delta King Seed Company. "That means in January, (when oil averaged $64.95 per barrel) this country exported over $10 billion of its wealth to OPEC." - David Bennett, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Rain -- too little too late for wheat?
    03/29/06   
    Some elevator managers have compared the 2006 wheat crop to the 2002 and the 1996 wheat crops. During the recent weeks, cash wheat prices have fallen about 41 cents and harvest forward contract prices have declined about 47 cents. The price declines are due mostly to expectations of and then actual rainfall over much of the hard red-winter wheat area. The rain was beneficial. However, the rain may have been too little, too late. - Kim Anderson, Farm Press Editorial Staff

    Sign Up for MarketMaxx
    04/05/06   
    Sign up and play The Corn And Soybean Digest's fantasy grain game called MarketMaxx. It's easy, fun and hopefully you'll learn a little more about how to market the corn and beans your raise. It's easy to sign-up. Just log on to http://www.marketmaxx.net and register at the top left and begin trading your fictitious 100,000 bu. of corn and 50,000 bu. of soybeans. If you're a winner at the end of the game on October 31 you could take home the grand prize of a year's use of a Massey Ferguson tractor or combine. Or, win additional prizes such as a computer system from Syngenta Crop Protection, customized rugged mobile computers from Grayhill Custom Mobile Solutions or a high-speed satellite Internet service from Agristar Global Networks. - The Corn & Soybean Digest



    ABOUT THIS NEWSLETTER

    You are subscribed to this newsletter as #email#

    To get this newsletter in a different format (Text or HTML), or to change your e-mail address, please visit your profile page to change your delivery preferences.

    For questions concerning delivery of this newsletter, please contact our Customer Service Department at:
    Customer Service Department
    Corn & Soybean Digest and Farm Industry News
    A Prism Business Media publication
    US Toll Free: 866-505-7173 International: 847-763-9504 Email:cropnewsweekly@pbinews.com
    US Toll Free: (866) 505-7173
    International: (402) 505-7173

    Prism Business Media
    9800 Metcalf Avenue
    Overland Park, KS 66212

    Copyright 2006, Prism Business Media. All rights reserved. This article is protected by United States copyright and other intellectual property laws and may not be reproduced, rewritten, distributed, re-disseminated, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast, directly or indirectly, in any medium without the prior written permission of Prism Business Media. About This Newsletter

    To unsubscribe from this newsletter go to: Unsubscribe

    To subscribe to this newsletter, go to: Subscribe

    For information on advertising in Crop News Weekly, please contact: Mike Santi.

    Farm Industry News
    Product of the Week




    View and read about the Farm Industry News Product of the Week.

    Click here to visit farmindustrynews.com




    Corn & Soybean Digest
    Market News



    Richard A. Brock

    Check out the latest corn and soybean market advice from marketing guru Richard Brock by visiting cornandsoybeandigest.com