A Primedia Property
March 30, 2005 050330

ADVERTISEMENT



Table of Contents
Logan Hawkes
Brazilian cotton farmers facing loss on 2004-05 crop
South Korea monitoring U.S. corn imports
Second case of Asian soybean rust found in Florida
Market Watch: Brazil's bean crop
From the Top of the Hill
Seven steps may reduce stress on family farms
The Road Warrior: Commodities or value-added?
Budget pain
New Web site provides alfalfa information
Atrazine alert
Column: Chambliss balks at president's budget cuts
USDA announces conservation security program sign up
NCGA notes disappointment in WTO


ADVERTISEMENT
There are a lot of confusing recommendations on how to control soybean rust, but effectively managing rust requires 2 modes of action, both a triazole and a strobilurin. Quadris + Tilt delivers this two way control to cure early stages of rust infestation that may be present in your field, plus prevent rust from further infecting your crop.

For more information about how to protect your fields from the threat of soybean rust, visit www.soybeanrust.com

Letter from the Editor
Logan Hawkes
03/30/05    Crop News Weekly
It's spring and, as always, talk around the coffee shop is turning to the weather. The current "El Niño" we're experiencing is weakening say experts, and is expected to progress into a 'neutral' period instead of a "La Niña" condition like the ones that often follow El Niño. For the Midwest, that could mean a drier, warmer summer. But with forecasters calling for an above average tropical season again this year, that could all change, especially the further south you live. Throw that around the cafe table tomorrow and see if it will fly.

Kicking things off this issue, Brazilian cotton farmers may be basking in the glow of their victory over the U.S. cotton program in the WTO, but any celebrations are being tempered by the grim price outlook for cotton. In related news, the word in Ponta Grossa, Parana, Brazil, is that drought has reduced soybean production by about 5 million tons more than what USDA projected in its March 10 world agricultural supply and demand estimates. Elsewhere in the news, the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) said last week it was investigating imports of U.S. corn to determine if they were contaminated by an unapproved corn variety. And news out of the south, more bad news for the U.S. soybean industry as Florida reports a second case of Asian soybean rust in the central portion of the state. Finally this week, reducing stress on the farm is a priority for successful operations, and now there is a guide to follow to help you realize that objective.

You'll find all this and more in this issue of Crop News Weekly. Happy reading.


ADVERTISEMENT


"We have dealt with glyphosate-resistant marestail, and we have relied on a burndown alternative, Gramoxone Max®, to manage it. Using other herbicides in corn, like LUMAX®, helps us control resistant marestail in corn so it is less of a problem in soybeans. Using other chemistries saves glyphosate to provide effective in-season weed control in soybeans." - Doug Corey, Bridgeville, DE

Resistance Ready? http://www.resistancefighter.com

From our Magazines
Brazilian cotton farmers facing loss on 2004-05 crop
Forrest Laws
03/29/05    Farm Press Daily
Brazilian cotton farmers may be basking in the glow of their victory over the U.S. cotton program in the WTO, but any celebrations are being tempered by the grim price outlook for cotton. "A lot of growers have not fixed their contracts for their 2004-05 crop," said Chris Ward, a cotton farmer from Rondonopolis in Mato Grosso, Brazil. "They have fixed costs, but they don't have many sales on their books." With prices seemingly stuck around 38 to 40 cents per pound, fob port or industry, when he spoke at the USDA Agricultural Outlook Forum in Washington, Ward said many Brazilian cotton producers are looking at the possibility of a 20-cent-per-pound cash loss when they sell cotton this year.


South Korea monitoring U.S. corn imports
Richard Brock
03/28/05    The Corn & Soybean Digest
The Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) said on Friday it was investigating imports of U.S. corn to determine if they were contaminated by an unapproved corn variety. It also said on its Web site (http://www.kfda.go.kr) that Seoul would require a certificate for future imports of U.S. food-grade corn stating that the cargo did not contain Bt10 -- an insect-resistant corn strain that has not been approved for food in Korea and other countries.


Second case of Asian soybean rust found in Florida
Forrest Laws
03/25/05    Farm Press Daily
University of Florida researchers have confirmed the finding of a second case of Asian soybean rust in the central portion of the state. The latest case was discovered March 22 on old and new kudzu leaves in Hernando County. Germination tests on the sample confirmed spore viability. Hernando is just north of Pasco County where an earlier case of soybean rust was confirmed Feb. 22. The finds were confirmed by microscopy at the Florida Division of Plant Industry and PCR tests at the University of Florida's Department of Plant Pathology, according to the University of Florida's Asian Soybean Rust Web site.


Market Watch: Brazil's bean crop
Elton Robinson
03/24/05    Farm Press Daily
The word in Ponta Grossa, Parana, Brazil, is that drought has reduced soybean production by about 5 million tons more than what USDA projected in its March 10 world agricultural supply and demand estimates, according to a director of a large cooperative in the country. Dusi Demostenes, secretary director of Coopagricola in Ponta Grossa, said at a media tour March 10, that about 2 percent of the soybean crop in southern Brazil has been harvested, but growers are not selling their beans. "They believe the price is going up."


From the Top of the Hill
Scott Shearer
03/25/05    National Hog Farmer
EPA Extends Signup for Air Emission Consent Agreement - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has extended the deadline to July 1, 2005 for producers to sign the Air Emissions Consent Agreement. The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) is urging all pork producers to participate in this agreement. More information can be found about the agreement on NPPC's website at: http://www.nppc.org/hot_topics/airemissions.html.

Consumer Group Favors Opening the U.S. -Canadian Border - A major consumer group, Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), says in its new report, Name That Cow, that "there is no public health basis for preventing young Canadian animals from entering the United States." CSPI believes Canada's mandatory national animal identification and tracking system is effective. "Instead of trying to keep out competition from Canada, the American cattle industry should support a mandatory national animal identification and tracking system in this country," according to CSPI.

Egypt Reopens for U.S. Beef - Egypt announced that it was resuming imports of U.S. beef and beef products from animals less than 30 months of age. This is a huge market for U.S. beef liver. Of the $30 million in beef sales to Egypt in 2003, 65% was liver.

Japan Beef Resolution - Senator John Thune (R-SD) introduced Senate Resolution 87, which expresses the Sense of the Senate that if Japan does not open its borders to U.S. beef, the U.S. Trade Representative would seek economic sanctions against Japan. Thune said, "Japan owes American ranchers more action and less bureaucratic double-talk. American consumers and ranchers know American beef is safe. Japan has no scientific reason not to open the border. Japan's ban amounts to a trade barrier and requires a strong U.S. response." Congressman Jerry Moran (R-KS) introduced an identical resolution earlier this year.

Expansion of BSE Research Program - USDA announced an expansion of its bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) research program. The new projects will include "international collaborations with the Veterinary Laboratory Agency in Great Britain to study the biology of the BSE agent, the Italian BSE Reference Laboratory to evaluate present diagnostic tools for detecting atypical BSE cases, and the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain to compare North American and European BSE strains."

Agricultural Groups Support CAFTA - The Agriculture Coalition for Central America Free Trade Agreement-DR (CAFTA-DR) has sent a letter to members of the House and Senate urging support for the free trade agreement (FTA) with Central America and the Dominican Republic (DR). The letter stated, "over 99% of food and agricultural products from these countries already receive duty free treatment in the United States, while U.S. farm exports face significant barriers in these markets." The coalition membership is comprised of 52 food and agricultural organizations, including American Farm Bureau Federation, American Meat Institute, American Soybean Association, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Chicken Council, National Corn Growers Association, National Milk Producers Federation, National Pork Producers Council, USDA Rice Federation, and Wheat Export Trade Education Committee.

CAFTA-DR Hearing - The Senate Finance Committee will hold a hearing on the U.S.-Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) when Congress returns from its spring recess. Senator Charles Grassley (R-IA), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said, "CAFTA is the foundation of our relationship with the Dominican Republic and Central America. It's an important agreement that will provide significant benefits to U.S. farmers, manufacturers and service workers."

USDA Changes - We are beginning to see a number of changes at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Nancy Bryson, USDA General Counsel, has resigned effective April 15. Mary Waters, Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations, will be leaving in April. We can expect to see more changes at USDA in the next few months.

Congressional Spring Recess - Congress is in recess this week and next. Many Congressmen will be hosting town hall meetings while back in their districts. This is a great opportunity to meet your Congressman and let them know what issues are of concern to you and the pork industry.

Seven steps may reduce stress on family farms
Ron Smith
03/23/05    Southwest Farm Press
Farmer says the sometimes harsh nature of farming -dealing with weather, pests and prices - combines with the complexity of running a family business to create an ideal environment for stress. Some folks, who don't know better, might assume that modern day farm families live idyllic lives in the tranquil serenity of bucolic settings, close to nature and free of the daily stresses that afflict urbanites who sally forth each day to battle traffic, deadlines and unappreciative supervisors. Perhaps on some planet, but not this one.


The Road Warrior: Commodities or value-added?
Dave Kohl
03/23/05    The Corn & Soybean Digest
Ag Road Warrior Dave Kohl writes: In seminars in Pennsylvania and Maryland, I was asked the same question within a 24-hour period, "Should I produce commodities or go value added?" The following is a quick synopsis of my response. First, if you are going to be a commodity producer, you first must look within. If you are a person that likes independence, not having to deal with people and prefer production as opposed to deal making, then being a commodity producer probably fits your profile. If you are a commodity producer, you must be a low cost producer with a special eye on the fixed cost structure.


Budget pain
Wayne Wenzel
03/23/05    Farm Industry News
Representatives of Congress and state governors both Republican and Democrat are hoping to defend price supports and 28 agriculture programs that President Bush wants to either cut or abolish in the 2006 budget. Bush says trimming "non-security" spending is necessary to deal with the country's growing budget deficit, which now stands at more than $427 billion. Democrats generally blame the deficit on Bush's aggressive tax cuts for the wealthy, while Republicans point to the recession and the ongoing war on terror.


New Web site provides alfalfa information
03/24/05    Hay & Forage Grower
Forage Genetics International's new Web site, www.alfalfa.info, is a free, non-commercial resource offering alfalfa production and management information. The Web site's articles and features are managed by uni-versity alfalfa experts from across the U.S. Its "Ask The Expert" feature allows growers to post questions to regional alfalfa experts and promises a prompt response. The site also features a monthly article on a timely alfalfa topic, as well as links to additional information, to help growers improve the profitability of their alfalfa pro-duction enterprises.


Atrazine alert
Wayne Wenzel
03/23/05    Farm Industry News
In 2003 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency began requiring that atrazine manufacturers increase monitoring of selected surface water supplies. Although atrazine is highly water soluble, EPA monitoring data found that atrazine is not contaminating groundwater significantly. The problem is that atrazine is showing up in higher-than-expected concentrations in surface water, such as reservoirs, ponds and lakes. In response, the EPA has ordered atrazine manufacturers to develop a comprehensive monitoring program for community water systems with high atrazine levels.


Column: Chambliss balks at president's budget cuts
Forrest Laws
03/22/05    Southwest Farm Press
We're not sure what Saxby Chambliss is running for other than to keep his Senate seat from Georgia. But there's little doubt many Sun Belt farmers would vote for him following his handling of President Bush's proposed budget cuts for agriculture. According to Washington reports, Chambliss went to Senate Budget Committee Chairman Jud Gregg, R-N.H., and persuaded him to reduce the budget cuts for agriculture from the president's proposed $4.49 billion to $2.8 billion over the next five years.



ADVERTISEMENT


Proven Yield Protection

Effectively managing weed competition all season long is a must to maximize yield potential, and yield is what you´re paid for. What sometimes isn´t clear is which herbicide system will deliver maximum yield. Results from trials across the Midwest show the potentially high cost of total post weed control in RR corn and demonstrate that the best strategy for optimizing yield potential is starting with a crop-safe, season-long residual pre-emergence herbicide such as LUMAX®.
To view the field trial data, and get more information on Syngenta products, click www.syngentacropprotection-us.com/btsTrack/index.asp?BTS=proven_yield , or contact your local retailer.

From the News Wire
USDA announces conservation security program sign up
03/25/05    NCGA News
The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) reminds growers the Conservation Security Program (CSP) signup period begins March 28. The program, available to approximately 235,000 farmers and ranchers in 220 watershed areas, includes a new renewable energy component. The renewable energy fuel component makes available compensation to eligible producers for converting to renewable energy fuels such as ethanol and soy biodiesel, for recycling 100 percent of on-farm lubricants, and for implementing energy production, including wind, solar, geothermal and methane production.


NCGA notes disappointment in WTO
03/24/05    NCGA News
The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) today expressed disappointment in the setback in World Trade Organization (WTO) agriculture negotiations when members last week broke off talks on establishing a common methodology for farm tariff conversions. Talks were suspended late March 17 due to continued differences between the European Union (EU) and the G-10 alliance (Switzerland, Norway and Bulgaria) on one side and the far exporting nations (Brazil and the United States) on the other, regarding the conversion of specific tariffs for products traded under the most distorted markets.


About this Newsletter

You are subscribed to Crop News Weekly as <*email*>

To unsubscribe click Unsubscribe:

To subscribe , click Subscribe

For information on advertising in Crop News Weekly, please contact: onlinesales@primediabusiness.com

 

To get this newsletter in a different format (Text, AOL or HTML), or to change your e-mail address, please visit your profile page to change your delivery preferences

For questions concerning delivery of this newsletter, please contact our Customer Service Department at:
US Toll Free: (866) 505-7173
International: (402) 505-7173
or custserv@newsletter.primediabusiness.com

Primedia Business Magazines & Media
9800 Metcalf Avenue
Overland Park, KS 66212

Copyright 2005, PRIMEDIA. All rights reserved. This article is protected by United States copyright and other intellectual property laws and may not be reproduced, rewritten, distributed, re-disseminated, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast, directly or indirectly, in any medium without the prior written permission of Primedia Business Magazines & Media Inc.