A Primedia Property
April 13, 2005 050413

ADVERTISEMENT



Table of Contents
Logan Hawkes
Five percent of growers decreasing acres due to rust
USDA data bearish for corn market
Theisse's Thoughts: Custom rates increasing
News from the Top of the Hill
CITA: Safeguard proceedings against Chinese imports
Management fees and its purpose
Budget proposals 'unfairly target Sunbelt,' NCC says
More soybean rust resources
New technology makes cotton crucial to Defense Dept.
Soybean harvest simplified
Rust in perspective
Energy bill should address high natural gas prices
ASA supports Water Resources Development Act


ADVERTISEMENT
There are a lot of confusing recommendations on how to control soybean rust, but effectively managing rust requires 2 modes of action, both a triazole and a strobilurin. Quadris + Tilt delivers this two way control to cure early stages of rust infestation that may be present in your field, plus prevent rust from further infecting your crop.

For more information about how to protect your fields from the threat of soybean rust, visit http://www.soybeanrust.com

Letter from the Editor
Logan Hawkes
04/13/05    Crop News Weekly
In contrast to the majority of soybean growers in America, about 11-percent said they considered soy bean rust as a factor before planting for the year. But only about half of those said they would plant less acres because of the threat. Take a look inside and find out what farmers are thinking about the rust threat.

Elsewhere in the news this week, USDA's monthly supply/demand update released Friday held bearish news for the corn market as the agency boosted its estimate of 2004-2005 ending stocks more than most people were anticipating. Also this week, and no surprise here, fuel costs are raising the cost of farming and contract farming alike. And there are even more soybean resources available to growers this week. Find out what and where. In other news, is it possible farmers will turn back to cotton as a money-maker? Non-woven cotton fabric promises to fill a critical strategic goal for the U.S. Department of Defense Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Program in the future. Finally this week, small and simple. Those were the guide words for developing a new type of harvesting system for soybean growers in Brazil. Is this in your future?

You'll find these stories and more in this issue of Crop News Weekly. Happy reading.


ADVERTISEMENT
OUR PROMISE. Starting with a corn and soybean germplasm base second to none, adding our new Agrisure™ brand glyphosate-tolerant and Bt insect-resistant traits - with more in the pipeline - Syngenta proudly brings true competition to the marketplace by offering you a welcome alternative. And through Garst®, Golden Harvest® and NK®, your choices will grow. YOUR CHOICE.


From our Magazines
Five percent of growers decreasing acres due to rust
Elton Robinson
04/11/05    Farm Press Daily
Most U.S. producers say that Asian soybean rust wasn't even a factor in their planting decisions this year. However, of the 11 percent of U.S. producers who did consider Asian rust a factor, almost half said they intend to decrease acres because of the disease. Hence, a little over 5 percent of U.S. soybean producers intend to decrease acres due to rust. In the Mid-South, 19 percent of soybean producers said that rust was a factor in their planting decision. Of these producers, 63 percent said they will reduce their soybean acres this year because of it.


USDA data bearish for corn market
Richard Brock
04/11//05    The Corn & Soybean Digest
Friday morning's USDA monthly supply/demand update held bearish news for the corn market as the agency boosted its estimate of 2004-2005 ending stocks more than most people were anticipating. The report appears to be neutral for soybeans and neutral to friendly for the wheat market as the USDA cut ending stocks for those commodities in line with trade expectations. The USDA pegged U.S. corn ending stocks at 2.215 billion bushels, vs. trade estimates averaging 2.157 billion bushels in a range from 2.075-2.255 billion.


Theisse's Thoughts: Custom rates increasing
Kent Thiesse
04/11/05    The Corn & Soybean Digest
As would be expected with rapidly increasing fuel costs, average 2005 custom rates for most farm work has also risen, compared to 2004 custom rates. The average cost of diesel fuel in the Upper Midwest is approximately 50 percent higher than a year ago, and most custom rates for farm work in 2005 are 2-8% above the rates a year earlier, with an average increase of about 5%. The largest increases in custom rates in 2005 were for tillage operations, which tend to use more fuel than some other farm operations. In addition to higher fuel costs, increasing costs for new and used machinery is also a factor in the higher custom rates for 2005.


News from the Top of the Hill
Scott Shearer
04/08/05    National Hog Farmer
Live Canadian Swine Do Not Injure U.S. - The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) ruled unanimously that the importation of live swine from Canada does not injure the U.S. pork industry. With the ITC's decision, the Commerce Department will not be imposing duties ranging up to 18.87%. The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) in a press release commented, "Thousands of U.S. producers have been economically hurt while the U.S. market has been flooded with dumped Canadian hogs. Canadian hog producers have an unfair advantage over U.S. producers due to generous federal and provincial government subsidies in Canada. We are now in the process of considering our options for how U.S. pork producers will achieve a level playing field in the North American pork industry." The Pork Trade Action Coalition, who opposed NPPC's petition on Canadian hogs, stated, "This is a victory for the hundreds of American farmers who have adapted to the advantages offered by NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement) and who would have been devastated by the proposed duties."

Investigation of USDA Oversight of Livestock and Poultry Markets - U.S. Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) has called for an investigation of how "thoroughly and effectively" USDA is enforcing the Packers and Stockyards Act of 1921. Harkin is asking USDA's Office of Inspector General (OIG) to conduct an investigation into how "aggressively and accurately" USDA's Grain Inspection and Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) is "examining and reporting anti-competitive and unfair market practices" in the livestock and poultry markets. Some of the issues that Harkin would like the OIG to consider include:

  • Evaluate the GIPSA complaints and investigations between 1999 and 2005 to determine how many complaints producers filed and how many complaints were initiated by GIPSA.

  • Of the number of complaints that were filed, how many became investigations? How many investigations have been left open for an extended period of time and why haven't they been concluded or closed? How many investigations were "halted or closed" at the direction of GIPSA headquarters?

  • How many of the investigations approved by GIPSA headquarters resulted in "formal administrative complaints for violations of the Packers and Stockyards Act?"

    Lamb Checkoff Approved - USDA announced the national lamb referendum was approved by 80% of individuals who voted in the referendum earlier this year. Those who voted in favor of the referendum accounted for 84% of the total production voted. The program needed a majority of those voting and a majority of the volume of lambs produced, fed or slaughtered. Producers, breeders, feeders and exporters will be required to pay an assessment of one-half cent per pound when live animals are sold. The first handler, primarily packers, will pay an additional 30 cents per head on animals purchased for slaughter.

    North American BSE Strategy - Canada, Mexico, and the United States announced the establishment of a harmonized approach to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk mitigation. The purpose is to "more effectively" address BSE risk in North America. This science-based strategy is to "normalize trade in ruminants and ruminant products within North America and to promote an international BSE strategy" consistent with Office of Epizootics (OIE) guidelines.

    Agriculture Coalition Supports DR-CAFTA - Fifty-five food and agricultural companies and associations have sent a letter to every member of the Senate and House of Representatives urging their support for the U.S.-Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA). The letter stated: "Over 99% of the food and agriculture products we import from the region enter duty-free. On the other hand, the food and agriculture tariffs for our products must overcome in the CAFTA-DR countries exceed 11% on average, but can range as high as 150% or more on sensitive products." Those signing the letter included the American Farm Bureau Federation, American Meat Institute, American Soybean Association, Animal Health Institute, National Association of Wheat Growers, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, National Chicken Council, National Corn Growers Association, National Pork Producers Council, National Turkey Federation, and USA Rice Federation. The House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee has announced that it will hold a hearing on implementation of DR-CAFTA on April 21. The White House would like for Congress to vote on the agreement this year. It faces strong opposition from labor and the sugar industry.

    TPA Extension - President Bush has asked Congress to extend Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) for an additional two years. TPA currently applies to trade agreements signed before July 1, 2005. TPA will automatically be extended two years unless the House of Representatives or the Senate disapproves the President's request by July 1. It will be very important for TPA to continue if the United States hopes to make progress during the Doha negotiations.

    CITA: Safeguard proceedings against Chinese imports
    Forrest Laws
    04/12/05    Farm Press Daily
    The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements announced that it would begin safeguard proceedings to determine whether textile and apparel imports from China threaten to disrupt the U.S. market. The move came as the Commerce Department released numbers showing that imports of cotton and man-made fiber trousers from China jumped 1,521 percent in the first three months of 2005. Shipments of cotton knit shirts by Chinese manufacturers rose 1,257 percent.


    Management fees and its purpose
    Dave Kohl
    04/04/05    The Corn & Soybean Digest
    Ag road warrior Dave Kohl writes: One of the students enrolled in our Farm Credit University ag lender training class asked me to explain the "management fee" and its purpose. First, a management fee is deducted when deriving rate of return on assets and many of the other profitability measures recommended by the Farm Financial Standards Council, of which I was facilitator. Currently to derive management fee, we suggest that you multiply 5% by earned gross farm revenue and add $15,000. For example, a producer who generates $500,000 in revenue would have a fee of $40,000, which is deducted to calculate the profitability measures.


    Budget proposals 'unfairly target Sunbelt,' NCC says
    Forrest Laws
    04/05/05    Farm Press Daily
    President Bush's 2006 budget proposals unfairly target Sunbelt crops and could reduce the gross income of farmers in the region by 10 to 30 percent, the chairman of the National Cotton Council said in a speech at the Mid-South Farm and Gin Show. Woods Eastland, a producer and cooperative executive from Doddsville, Miss., said that if the proposals had been in effect for the 2004 crop about one-half of the cotton produced in the United States would have been ineligible for the marketing loan.


    More soybean rust resources
    Wayne Wenzel
    04/06/05    Farm Industry News
    Nobody knows for sure whether or not Asian soybean rust will attack your fields this year. But when the disease showed up in soybean fields throughout the southern United States last fall, soybean rust became one of the most thoroughly promoted soybean diseases ever. What's the effect of all that coverage? It seems to vary. Some farmers we've interviewed started stockpiling fungicides and updating their spray equipment months ago. At the other end of the spectrum, skeptics wonder if dire predictions of $4.5 billion in potential yield losses could just be hype to sell fungicides.


    New technology makes cotton crucial to Defense Dept.
    04/08/05
    Ron Smith    Southwest Farm Press
    Cotton, it's not just for blue jeans anymore. In fact, a non-woven cotton fabric promises to fill a critical strategic goal for the U.S. Department of Defense Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Program. A newly developed three-layered product includes a middle layer of sorbent carbon, an anti-microbial layer and a layer of cotton. Used as a wipe, the product will clean contaminants, biological or chemical, from equipment parts and human skin. It may also be used in protective clothing. A non-particulate characteristic keeps the wipe devoid of dirty loose particulates.


    Soybean harvest simplified
    Peg Zenk
    Farm Industry News
    SMALL AND simple. Those were the guide words for developing a new type of harvesting system for soybean growers in Brazil. The inventors -- agricultural engineers Milford Hanna and Cezar Mesquita -- knew simplicity and affordability were crucial components of any practical new design for the many small farmers in this South American country. The machine they created has not only met those criteria, but is also gentler on the crop than conventional combines are.


    Rust in perspective
    Karen McMahon
    Farm Industry News
    FEW TOPICS in the past have dominated the winter farm shows like Asian soybean rust. I'll bet there's not a single farmer in the Midwest who hasn't heard of the disease by now. What's remarkable is how rust has monopolized magazine coverage and dominated ag conferences and coffee shop sessions. We all know more about this fungal plant disease, which has barely entered the Midwest, than we know about soybean cyst nematode and other common pests that have hindered soybean yields for years. Based on what I've privately heard from farmers, many of you already have stocked up on fungicides.



    ADVERTISEMENT


    "We have dealt with glyphosate-resistant marestail, and we have relied on a burndown alternative, Gramoxone Max®, to manage it. Using other herbicides in corn, like LUMAX®, helps us control resistant marestail in corn so it is less of a problem in soybeans. Using other chemistries saves glyphosate to provide effective in-season weed control in soybeans." - Doug Corey, Bridgeville, DE

    Resistance Ready? http://www.resistancefighter.com

    From the News Wire
    Energy bill should address high natural gas prices
    04/08/05    NCGA News
    The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) commends Sens. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) for urging the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to address the impact of high natural gas costs on the U.S. agriculture sector as the committee considers comprehensive energy legislation in the coming weeks.


    ASA supports Water Resources Development Act
    04/06/05    American Soybean Association
    The 26,000 members of the American Soybean Association (ASA) strongly support the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) legislation introduced today by Senator Kit Bond (R-MO) to provide $2.475 billion for construction of seven new locks and other improvements on the upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. The bill was co-sponsored by James Inhofe (R-OK), Charles Grassley (R-IA), Tom Harkin (D-IA), Jim Talent (R-MO), Barack Obama (D-IL), Mary Landrieu (D-LA), John Cornyn (R-TX), Thad Cochran (R-MS), Pete Domenici (R-NM), David Vitter (R-LA), John Warner (R-VA), George Voinovich (R-OH), Johnny Isakson R-GA), John Thune (R-SD) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK).


  • About this Newsletter

    You are subscribed to Crop News Weekly as <*email*>

    To unsubscribe click Unsubscribe:

    To subscribe , click Subscribe

    For information on advertising in Crop News Weekly, please contact: Mike Santi.

     

    To get this newsletter in a different format (Text, AOL or HTML), or to change your e-mail address, please visit your profile page to change your delivery preferences

    For questions concerning delivery of this newsletter, please contact our Customer Service Department at:
    US Toll Free: (866) 505-7173
    International: (402) 505-7173
    or custserv@newsletter.primediabusiness.com

    Primedia Business Magazines & Media
    9800 Metcalf Avenue
    Overland Park, KS 66212

    Copyright 2005, PRIMEDIA. All rights reserved. This article is protected by United States copyright and other intellectual property laws and may not be reproduced, rewritten, distributed, re-disseminated, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast, directly or indirectly, in any medium without the prior written permission of Primedia Business Magazines & Media Inc.