Mobile Version   Web Version   Add to Safe Sender List   Renew your Subscription to National Hog Farmer From the editors of National Hog Farmer Magazine
National Hog Farmer Weekly Preview
February 7, 2011
 
In this issue:
  Profits are not a Pipe Dream
  Track AI Technician Performance for Clues to Improve Farrowing Rate
  Wholesale Pork Reporting Committee Formed
  NPPC Urges Early Release of CRP Acres

MARKET PREVIEW
Profits are not a Pipe Dream
You can make $30/head. Sounds like a pipe dream with cash corn over $6.55/bu. in Omaha and corn futures bumping $7/bu. on the July contract. Add in cash soybean meal over $370, basis Illinois and meal futures near $390 and the mountain just gets higher. But Friday’s futures markets would allow producers whose production parameters match those of average Iowa farrow-to-finish operations (Figure 1;according to Shane Ellis and colleagues at Iowa State University’s [ISU] Department of Economics) to lock in profits of $29.82/head for pigs to be sold in May.

Granted, it’s not exactly $30 and it’s only for one month, but my point is that things are certainly not all gloom and doom. Friday’s corn, soybean and Lean Hogs (LH) futures prices would give ISU’s average farrow-to-finish operation an average profit of $7.20/head for 2011. Again, it’s not the $22 and $25/head received in 2004 and 2005, but it is a far cry from the losses of $22 and $26/head in 2008 and 2009. And, it is much closer to last year’s $10.29/head than we have been since last summer!

I don’t like the cost situation we are in any better than any of you do. I still think it is contrived and unfair. But as I have written in the past, it is what it is and professionals must deal with the world as it is instead of as they would like it to be.

FULL ARTICLE

PRODUCTION PREVIEW
Track AI Technician Performance for Clues to Improve Farrowing Rate
We selected 22 farms from Swine Management Services (SMS) database that recorded the technician responsible for inseminating each breeding female, the weekday and time of day the insemination occurred (military time, hour 01:00 to 24:00).

We understand that some farms record time of mating simply by AM or PM, and that some sow record programs are limited in the amount of detail they will accept. However, if we are to drill down to identify the problems that plague some breeding herds, this type of detailed, individual information is required.

At SMS, we have developed the In-Depth Analysis Report and the Breeding Technician Report, which takes detailed data and turns it into charts and graphs that track farrowing rate by AI technician, by hour of the day inseminated, by day of the week inseminated, by parity, by wean-to-first-service interval, by number of matings, by boar semen lot, etc.

FULL ARTICLE

LEGISLATIVE PREVIEW
Wholesale Pork Reporting Committee Formed
USDA announced the establishment of the Wholesale Pork Reporting Negotiated Rulemaking Committee. The committee is to develop proposed language to amend the Livestock Mandatory Reporting (LMR) regulations to implement mandatory pork price reporting. In negotiated rulemaking, a proposed rule is developed by a committee composed of representatives of government and representatives of affected parties. Members on the committee will be represented by the American Meat Institute; Chicago Mercantile Exchange; Food Marketing Institute; Grocery Manufacturers Association; Livestock Marketing Information Center; National Farmers Union; National Livestock Producers association; National Meat Association; National Pork Producers Council; North American Meat Processors Association, American Association of Meat Processors and Southeastern Meat Association (one combined representative for all three meat processor organizations); United Food and Commercial Workers International Union and, USDA Agricultural Marketing Service. The first meeting will be held Feb. 8-10, 2011, at the Sheraton Clayton Plaza Hotel, St. Louis, MO. For more information, contact Michael Lynch, USDA, at Michael.Lynch@ams.usda.gov.

FULL ARTICLE

NEWS FLASH
NPPC Urges Early Release of CRP Acres
The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) is urging Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack to release early and without penalty non-environmentally sensitive farm acres currently enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), so those acres can be placed into crop production to combat the growing possibility of feed-grain shortages that could jeopardize animal care.

NPPC’s letter sent last week also asked the agency to take “all other possible steps to open tight grain markets and provide access to USDA emergency programs to ensure that U.S. pork producers can feed the animals in their care.”

NPPC pointed out that while last year’s corn crop was among the four largest ever recorded, USDA projects corn carryover supplies for approximately 20 days and for soybeans of only 13 days. “Both are historic lows and will cause unprecedented levels of risk, prompt speculation in the marketplace and increase the likelihood of localized corn shortages,” the organization said. “The result will be, in addition to extreme price volatility, an economic environment in which U.S. pork producers may simply be unable to procure the grain necessary to feed the animals in their care.”

FULL ARTICLE

PORK INDUSTRY CALENDAR
Feb. 8-9, 2011: Ohio Pork Congress, Crown Plaza North, Columbus, OH; for more information contact: www.ohiopork.org.

Feb. 8 and 15, 2011: Employee Management Workshop for Agricultural Operations (three-part workshop), Amana Colonies Clarion Inn, Williamsburg, IA; for more information contact: Russ Euken, extension livestock specialist; by phone (641) 923-2856 or e-mail: reuken@iastate.edu or Mark Storlie, swine field specialist by phone (563) 425-3331 or e-mail: mstorlie@iastate.edu.



Feb. 9-10, 2011: Missouri Pork Expo, “Beyond the Barn,” Holiday Inn Select Columbia, MO for more information contact: Diane Slater, director of communications, Missouri Pork Association by phone (573) 445-8375, e-mail diane@mopork.com or go online http://www.mopork.com/Events_MissouriPorkExpo.asp.



Feb. 15-16, 2011: Illinois Pork Expo, Peoria Civic Center Peoria, IL; for more information contact: Illinois Pork Producers Association by phone (217) 529-3100 or www.ilpork.com.



FULL ARTICLE
advertisement

 BLUEPRINT

The October 15 Blueprint edition of National Hog Farmer provides guidelines for building a sound replacement gilt program, including nutritional considerations to maximize genetic potential and the importance of an effective herd health management program. In addition, the issue offers a special section on screening replacement gilt candidates for skeletal and reproductive soundness. http://www.nationalhogfarmer.com.

advertisement

 MAGAZINE HIGHLIGHTS

The January 15 edition of National Hog Farmer features an exclusive report from the largest livestock trade show in the European Union – EuroTier 2010 – staged in Hanover, Germany late last year. The special report includes a closer look at loose sow housing options, a profile of the German equipment and technology test center, plus a glimpse of some unique, energy saving features in a 1,000-sow, farrow-to-wean operation. Go to http://www.nationalhogfarmer.com to view the issue.

advertisement
U.S. pork producers must be able to compete in foreign markets without restrictive tariffs or sanitary barriers to trade. NPPC’s mission of gaining and expanding access to markets through free trade agreements is paramount to the continued success of the U.S. pork industry — Click here to learn more.

 POSTERS

FREE SELECTION GUIDES AND MANAGEMENT POSTERS
National Hog Farmer offers 10 posters targeting key production areas, offering guidance in critical areas such as feet and leg soundness and reproduction traits soundness in replacement gilts. Others include pig anatomy, heat detection, sow condition, etc. All posters are in English. Select posters are translated to Spanish, Chinese and Japanese.

 SUBSCRIBER TOOLS

Change E-mail   Unsubscribe
     
Web Version   Archive
     
advertisement
How can Compost-A-Mats clear up scouring litters?
  • Upon identifying scouring piglets, place a Compost-A-Mat directly under a heat lamp in the farrowing crate.
  • This will create a clean and warm area for piglets to dry up and help overall farrowing house performance.
  • The Compost-A-Mat should remain in the crate for seven days or until piglets have stopped scouring.
  • At this point, the Compost-A-Mat will contain fecal material and can be broken down for feedback.
For more info click here
advertisement

About This Newsletter