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National Hog Farmer Weekly Preview
June 27, 2011
 
In this issue:
  Breeding/Farrowing Intentions Don't Quite Jibe
  What a Difference a Couple of Weeks Makes
  Senators Call for Fair Treatment of U.S. Pork
  Three Tips to Keep Your Hogs Cool This Summer

MARKET PREVIEW
Breeding/Farrowing Intentions Don't Quite Jibe
Friday's quarterly Hogs and Pigs report from USDA contained no real surprises and will be viewed as neutral by today's trade. The U.S. data appear in Figure 1.

Most of the actual numbers were slightly larger than was expected by analysts' in pre-report estimates compiled by DowJones Newswires. Figure 1 shows these averages as well as the difference between actual and estimated year-on-year changes.

The only substantial difference between actual and expected inventories was the 120-179-lb. category of market hogs. USDA estimated that number at 12.424 million head, 3.3% larger than last year; analysts expected the number to be 1% larger than last year. The change for this weight category does not fit well with the changes for other weight categories, making it a bit suspicious. The increase suggests higher slaughter numbers from early-July through mid-August, so it will not be long before we see whether the USDA inventory estimate for that weight range was accurate.

FULL ARTICLE

FINANCIAL PREVIEW
What a Difference a Couple of Weeks Makes
Last week Dale Miller sent me a reminder that I had a column due for the coming week. I was on my way to Nashville to speak at the Financial Management conference at the time (June 15), so I began writing. I wanted to include the most-current information available and still meet the deadline. Then I received an apologetic note from Dale saying he'd misread the calendar and the column really wasn’t due until June 24. The changes in those 10 days are shown in the two charts attached.

Let's start with cash hog prices. The weighted average yesterday (June 23) hit an all-time high of over $103/cwt., carcass, which equates to over $212/carcass (Figure 1). In that short time span, we saw cash prices improve by over $20/ head. In addition, as we look at the corn crop in the Midwest and consider all of the cold, wet weather we have had, most everyone would have guessed corn prices would go up. Didn’t happen. Since the beginning of June, corn prices have dropped nearly $1/bu. Looking at the 12-month crush margin for midwestern producers on Wednesday (June 22), it stood at over $17/head (Figure 2).

FULL ARTICLE

LEGISLATIVE PREVIEW
Senators Call for Fair Treatment of U.S. Pork
As negotiations continue on Russia’s efforts to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Senators Ben Nelson (D-NE), Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and 26 other senators are asking U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Ron Kirk to further open the Russian market for American pork. In a letter to Kirk, the senators outlined two major barriers that U.S. pork faces with Russia: 1) Russia has continued to lower the United States share of the global import tariff-rate quota from 100,000 metric tons (110,000 tons) to 57,500 metric tons, (63,250 tons) and 2) Russia’s use of sanitary restrictions to limit U.S. pork exports to Russia. Senators urged USTR to "work toward encouraging Russia to ease the unwarranted restrictions and abide by commitments" as a precursor to joining the WTO. Senator Nelson said, "Russia’s restrictions on American pork not only violate WTO rules, but are harmful to the Nebraska pork industry and the U.S. pork industry." Senator Grassley said, "Russia's unjustified position against U.S. pork has blocked products from plants that account for 60% of U.S. pork production capacity. Russia wants to join the World Trade Organization. One of the issues Russia needs to address before joining is its unwarranted barriers to U.S. pork."

FULL ARTICLE

NEWS FLASH
Three Tips to Keep Your Hogs Cool This Summer
Summer months can trigger heat stress in livestock, especially in pigs, according to Mark Whitney, a swine specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension. Pigs are especially challenged because they lack functional sweat glands to help them efficiently reduce body heat.

Even though the majority of pigs today are raised in modern confinement facilities that provide some climate control, producers still face limits in their ability to cool pigs during extreme heat, he says.

Pigs naturally remove body heat during periods of heat stress through a combination of accelerated respiration, decreased feed intake, increased water consumption and adjustments in physical activity and movement.

FULL ARTICLE

PORK INDUSTRY CALENDAR
July 7, 2011: "Managing Your Unseen Employee: The Ventilation System," Borlaug Learning Center, Nashua, IA. For more information contact: Mark Storlie at (563) 425-3331 or e-mail mstorlie@iastate.edu.

July 16-19, 2011: American Veterinary Medical Association Annual Convention, America’s Center
downtown St. Louis, MO. For more information contact: https://www.avmaconvention.org.

July 19, 2011: The 2011 Lauren Christian Pork Chop Open, Veenker Memorial Golf Course, Ames, IA. For more information contact: Iowa Pork Industry Center at ipic@iasatte.edu or (515) 294-4103. The registration form is on the Iowa Pork Industry Center Web site, www.ipic.iastate.edu/events/LCPCObrochure11.pdf.

July 20, 2011: North American Manure Expo, Northeast Community College's Ag Complex, Norfolk, NE. For more information contact: Expo Planning Co-Chairs Chris Henry at (402) 472-6529 or chenry1@unl.edu or Leslie Johnson at (402) 584-3818 or ljohnson13@unl.edu. Also see the website for more details www.manureexpo.org.

FULL ARTICLE
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 BLUEPRINT

The April 15, 2011 Blueprint edition of National Hog Farmer offers details on creating stable herd health by developing a herd health profile, provides a review of basic immunology and gives details on how to select the right vaccine. The final article looks at efforts by a consortium of swine disease researchers to understand genetic disease resistance. www.nationalhogfarmer.com.

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 MAGAZINE HIGHLIGHTS

The June 15, 2011 edition of National Hog Farmer magazine focuses on the industry’s workforce with articles on how to build a farm culture, hire foreign workers and reverse turnover rates in a 90,000-sow system. A major feature looks at high feed costs and new waste management standards facing pork producers in North Carolina. Find these stories and more at www.nationalhogfarmer.com.

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 POSTERS

FREE SELECTION GUIDES AND MANAGEMENT POSTERS
National Hog Farmer offers 10 posters targeting key production areas, offering guidance in critical areas such as feet and leg soundness and reproduction traits soundness in replacement gilts. Others include pig anatomy, heat detection, sow condition, etc. All posters are in English. Select posters are translated to Spanish, Chinese and Japanese.

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